Grief

Grief: deep sorrow, especially that’s caused by someone’s death. Synonyms: sorrow, misery, sadness, anguish, pain, distress, heartache, heartbreak, agony, torment, affliction, suffering, woe, desolation, dejection, despair; mourning, mournfulness, bereavement, lamentation; literary dolor, dole.

Grief is a very sad thing, but it’s beautiful at the same time. Grief makes you realize how fragile yet beautiful life can be. Once the breath leaves the body and the person dies, it is finished they’re dead and you will never get that person back. You can never talk to them, hug them, touch them, or see them again, unless by picture or video. Death is only one breath away, one final breath away.

Grief hits every aspect of your life, mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual. Grief feels like your heart is bleeding. It’s surreal, like your walking in a room filled with fog trying to find a door to get out. Some days I don’t want to get out of bed, and other days I feel almost normal; I say almost because once you experience death you lose something that you’ll never replace, and you know that something very valuable is missing forever. Something irreplaceable, priceless, loved, and cherished.

Grief doesn’t have a bias; it can happened to anyone, anytime for a number of different reasons. There’s no pause button that you can push while in grief. The world never stops running, it continues 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, and it expects you to keep up with its demands in the midst of grief.

The world wants you to act like nothing ever happened, it expects you to keep up with it and its grueling schedules, put on a straight face and continue on like everything’s normal. And if you show grief, or you’re crying some people actually feel that you’re being weak and they get annoyed with you very quickly, so you have to pull yourself together in the mist of all the sadness, tuck your grief in a compartment in your mind, and pray that you don’t crack and cry.

Grief is a beast.


LISA SMITH- Reporter

MONICA SLABBEKOORN- Assistant Digital Editor

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